Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
AFI
 
Atmosphere
AFI:

The abbreviation for the American Film Institute, a special school that was founded for the establishment of an educational program for professional filmmakers.

Answer Print:

The laboratory's first composite print of the film footage and soundtrack for critical reviewing by the powers that be.

All-American Look:

Middle-American appearance; also called P&G look.

Apple Box:

A wooden four-sided object of varied sizes, used to elevate a person or object to required height for camera angles. When upended, the box can serve as a seat.

Ambient (Atmosphere) Sound Track:

The recording of the nebulous natural background and atmospheric sounds inherent in a scene. This recording is made for indoor as well as outdoor sets. After a scene has been filmed, the sound mixer orders the assistant director to call for absolute silence on the set, then turns on the recorder to capture to atmospheric quality that permeates the set. This special track provides the editor with sound continuity in cases where sound variances occur during filming, or sound gaps occur between match cuts. These gaps create unnatural silences in portions of the film. Therefore the editor lays in pieces of ambient sound track to complement the shots. Also known, popularly, by the term Room Tone, whether recorded for interior or exterior scenes.

Arc Light:

A large and cumbersome lamp of very high intensity. It was often used to simulate daylight when shooting a scene at night that takes place in the daytime (called night-for-day shooting). It has been mostly supplemented by smaller, more flexible incandescent lighting equipment. See HMI; Night-for-Day.

AMPTP:

The abbreviation for American Motion Picture and Television Producers. The membership comprises motion picture and television producers who establish programs and codes for industry employees.

Arriflex:

The brand name of a popular, portable reflex motion picture camera; called Arri. See Movicam, Panaflex, Steadicam.

Angle:

The field of view (perspective of a lens) from the position of the camera when filming. Normal angle places the camera at eye level. Low angle places the camera in a lowered position, shooting upward. High angle (A.K.A. down angle) places the camera in an elevated position, shooting downward. Wide angle encompasses a large area and holds full figures. Medium angle encompasses a small area and holds figures approximately from the waist up. Close angle (or Close-up) holds a magnified portion of a figure or an object.

Atmosphere:

(1.) The subtle aura pervading a scene. (2.) People in scene other than the principle actors (extras).